Facts about Gold-Filled

Facts about Gold-Filled

  

        Gold-filled is a United States officially recognized product, made of mechanical plating gold. Gold-filled is wining popularity across the Americas in recent years.  Gold-filled are made from a solid gold layer that is permanently bonded to a base metal. A thicker layer of solid gold bonded to a core (base metal) through heat and pressure. As  the core is using sterling silver although brass is used commonly. The gold layer is permanently bonded to the base, the gold to last forever and not wear or chip away.
      When something is gold-filled is valuable like solid gold. Thus, gold-filled jewellery cannot be compared to  electro plated jewellery in no aspect. Gold-filled has an actual 0.03 and 0.1 millimeters  thick layer of karat gold between, not just a microscopic film of gold. And so the layer is to 1000 times thicker than the film of gold used in gold plated goods.

   

     The Difference Between Pure Gold, Solid Gold and Gold-Filled; 24K Pure gold is not the same as solid gold and solid gold is not the same as gold-filled. 24K gold contains 99.99% root of gold. Solid gold is an alloy that is described with the karatage of pure gold. Wherein solid gold refers to any gold item where the inside of the item is not hollow. Gold-Filled is a layered product and karatage only refers to the surface gold layers. However
the outside gold layer must compose at least 5% of the product weight.

 
 

       By  the US and Canada law the total amount of gold on the piece must be at least 1/20 the weight of the completed product. These goods are often marked with the stamp “1/20 12K GF” and “1/20 14K GF.  Besides the Gold-Filled is strictly regulated and must meet federal quality standards set by the FTC - Federal Trade Commission, and Government regulatory boards.         
               

   

              The top layer is solid gold therefore gold-filled jewellery carries the look and wear of solid Gold jewellery.

 
 
  

                                              Wear gold-filled without worries of any allergic reaction, contact with the skin has 14 carat gold - nickel free only.    

 
 
 

            Precious Metals are regulated by the FTC. Bonded, Goldfilled and Gold Plated items are also regulated by the FTC. It is have been developed to protect the interest of the consumer from misleading or fraudulent claims of gold content for alternative products. Unfortunately, in the European Union there is no provision regulating in the cathegory.
   

Gold Jewelry; meaning 

 

Karats
When you buy gold jewelry, look for the karat quality mark. The karat mark should tell you how much pure gold is in the piece.

Pure gold – 24 karat (24K) gold – is soft, so it’s often mixed with other metals to increase its hardness and durability. The total of pure gold and other metal adds up to 24, so:

18K gold is 18 parts gold mixed throughout with 6 parts other metal
14K gold is 14 parts gold mixed throughout with 10 parts other metal
Near the karat quality mark, you should see the name or the U.S. registered trademark of the company that will stand behind the mark. The trademark may be in the form of a name, a symbol, or initials. If you’re considering a piece of gold jewelry but don’t see a trademark along with the karat mark, don’t buy it.

Solid Gold
“Solid gold” refers to any gold item where the inside of the item is not hollow. The karat mark still will denote the proportion of gold to other metal.

Gold Plated
Jewelry can be plated with gold by mechanical plating, electroplating, and other processes. Eventually, gold plating wears away. How soon depends on how often the item is worn and how thick the plating is.

”Gold filled,” “gold overlay,” and “rolled gold plate (RGP)” describe jewelry that has a layer of at least 10 karat gold mechanically applied to a base metal. These items should be marked with the term or abbreviation and the karat quality of the gold used (for example, 14K gold overlay or 12K RGP).
If the layer of gold is less than 1/20 of the weight of the metal in the entire item, any marking should state the fraction of karat gold (for example, 1/40 14K gold overlay).
“Gold electroplate” describes jewelry that has a layer (at least .175 microns) of at least 10 karat gold applied on a base metal by an electrolytic process.
Vermeil, a special type of gold plated product, consists of a base of sterling silver that is coated or plated with gold.

Gold Flashed or Gold Washed
The terms “gold flashed” and “gold washed” describe products that have an extremely thin electroplating of gold (less than .175 microns). This will wear away faster than gold plate, gold filled, or gold electroplate. 

         source:     
 https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0293-gold-silver-jewelry

  
 

Use of the terms ”Gold filled,” “gold overlay,” and “rolled gold plate (RGP)”

 
 
 
 •(2) Use of the word “Gold” or any abbreviation to describe all or part of an industry product composed throughout of an alloy of gold, unless a correct designation of the karat fineness of the alloy immediately precedes the word “Gold” or its abbreviation, and such fineness designation is of at least equal conspicuousness.
•(5) Use of the terms “Gold Filled,” “Rolled Gold Plate,” “Rolled Gold Plated,” “Gold Overlay,” or any abbreviation to describe all or part of an industry product unless such product or part contains a surface-plating of gold alloy applied by a mechanical process and of such thickness and extent of surface coverage that reasonable durability is assured, and unless the term is immediately preceded by a correct designation of the karat fineness of the alloy that is of at least equal conspicuousness as the term used.
•(1) An industry product or part thereof, composed throughout of an alloy of gold of not less than 10 karat fineness, may be marked and described as “Gold” when such word “Gold,” wherever appearing, is immediately preceded by a correct designation of the karat fineness of the alloy, and such karat designation is of equal conspicuousness as the word “Gold” (for example, “14 Karat Gold,” “14 K. Gold,” or “14 Kt. Gold”). Such product may also be marked and described by a designation of the karat fineness of the gold alloy unaccompanied by the word “Gold” (for example, “14 Karat,” “14 Kt.,” or “14 K.”).
Note to paragraph (c)(1):Use of the term “Gold” or any abbreviation to describe all or part of a product that is composed throughout of gold alloy, but contains a hollow center or interior, may mislead consumers, unless the fact that the product contains a hollow center is disclosed in immediate proximity to the term “Gold” or its abbreviation (for example, “14 Karat Gold-Hollow Center,” or “14 K. Gold Tubing,” when of a gold alloy tubing of such karat fineness).
Such products should not be marked or described as “solid” or as being solidly of gold or of a gold alloy. For example, when the composition of such a product is 14 karat gold alloy, it should not be described or marked as either “14 Kt. Solid Gold” or as “Solid 14 Kt. Gold.“
(3) An industry product or part thereof on which there has been affixed on all significant surfaces by soldering, brazing, welding, or other mechanical means, a plating of gold alloy of not less than 10 karat fineness and of substantial thickness may be marked or described as “Gold Filled,” “Gold Overlay,” “Rolled Gold Plate”oran adequate abbreviation, when such plating constitutes at least 1/20th of the weight of the metal in the entire article and when the term is immediately preceded by a designation of the karat fineness of the plating which is of equal conspicuousness as the term used (for example, “14 Karat Gold Filled,” “14 Kt. Gold Filled,” “14 Kt. G.F.,” “14 Kt. Gold Overlay,” or “14K. R.G.P.”).
When conforming to all such requirements except the specified minimum of 1/20th of the weight of the metal in the entire article, the terms “Gold Overlay” and “Rolled Gold Plate” may be used when the karat fineness designation is immediately preceded by a fraction accurately disclosing the portion of the weight of the metal in the entire article accounted for by the plating, and when such fraction is of equal conspicuousness as the term used (for example, “1/40th 12 Kt. Rolled Gold Plate” or “1/40 12 Kt. R.G.P.”).
 
source:
https://ftc.gov
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